Image for post
Image for post

First things first — the Original paper can be found here: https://outlierventures.io/research/the-open-metaverse-os/

In Dawn of the New Everything, his seminal work on virtual reality, Jaron Lanier describes Virtual Reality as “the substitution of the interface between a person and the physical environment with an interface to a simulated environment”. In truth, this is only one of dozens of different VR definitions in this important book, but it is crucial because it raises so many questions.

How do we, as humans in the physical realm, interface with worlds that have been conjured from the imagination, where the laws of physics do…


Image for post
Image for post
Photo by Michael Longmire on Unsplash

I expand on some of these ideas in my book, The Cryptocurrency Revolution, which is available here and from other booksellers, online and offline.

This week, Deutsche Bank raised some eyebrows (and upset quite a lot of people) by suggesting that employees who chose to work from home should pay an extra five per cent tax. In Britain, where working from home currently means you are liable for tax relief, this may sound counterintuitive. So, what was the idea?

During this year’s global pandemic, the plight of businesses that depend on the workers who normally pack out large office blocks…


Image for post
Image for post
Screenshot from Decentraland, a decentralized virtual reality platform

I expand on some of these ideas in my book, The Cryptocurrency Revolution, which is available here and from other booksellers, online and offline.

Ownership, identity and economics in the Metaverse

COVID-19 has changed the way we work, study and socialize, at least temporarily. Many of those who were privileged enough to transfer to remote working instead of losing their jobs will never return to the office, even if they want to. Companies have found — often to their surprise — that they can make significant cost and efficiency savings on office facilities, with little impact on output. And it wasn’t only the workplace that became digital…


Walmart’s patent application opens the door for an unholy mashup of privatised fiat currency, stablecoin and storecard loyalty points

Image for post
Image for post
Dishoom pounds — stablecoins in physical form, exchangeable for awesome food!

Nothing is simple any more. As far as your average shopper was concerned in the 20th and early 21st century, ‘money’ was the pound or peso in your pocket or the dollar or Deutschmark in your drawstring purse.

‘Money’ was printed paper or sometimes stamped metal rounds issued by your country’s central bank which sometimes bore an inscription promising to pay the bearer the requisite amount.

Mythology and national pride often surrounded these national currencies — and still does, to some…


Image for post
Image for post
Photo by Con Karampelas on Unsplash

I doubt this post will age well. In less than 48 hours, we’ll know a lot more about Libra, Facebook’s intriguing digital currency offering — and maybe the answers to these questions will become clear.

As an enthusiastic proponent of Bitcoin and a Facebook refusenik (I created an account once, some years ago under a burner email address in order to test an app but have never actually used it), I’m unlikely to be an early adopter — or any kind of adopter — of Libra.

But whether you’re horrified at the idea, love it or are indifferent, this feels…


Image for post
Image for post
Photo by Ricardo Gomez Angel on Unsplash

I expand on some of these ideas in my book, The Cryptocurrency Revolution, which is available here and from other booksellers, online and offline.

The past is a foreign country: they do things differently there. Technology years are like dog years — and this is even more the case with blockchain tech, where one year can sometimes feel more like 10.

While anyone who works in blockchain development is used to the idea of pivoting their business strategies and iterating over their code base to take advantage of changes so rapid they make JavaScript frameworks look slow to evolve, it…


Image for post
Image for post
Photo by Icons8 team on Unsplash

Regardless of the millions of words that have been written about cryptocurrencies and blockchain technology, it seems there is still a whole lot of confusion and urban folklore around the subject.

I’ve handpicked ten top crypto fallacies that I’ve heard people say, write or ask over the last few years and explained why they are wrong, wrong, wrong.

  1. You have to own a whole Bitcoin!

You can even get a T-shirt stating the contrary, but it’s curious how this misconception has hung around. …


In the affluent West, we take banking access for granted. A dizzying array of credit and debit cards, loans and financial vehicles are advertised to us, and — in Britain, at least — one of the consequences for many individuals have been disastrous.

Talking about financial inclusion in poorer countries such as Kenya — ‘banking the unbanked’ — is to miss the point somewhat, based on an incorrect assumption that allowing some of the poorest members of society to be targeted and bled dry by high-interest loans is always a good thing.

Anglophone countries have a blasé attitude to consumer…


New to crypto? Here are 20 questions you wanted to ask about Bitcoin, altcoins and ICOs

Image for post
Image for post

Photo by Andre Francois on Unsplash

I expand on some of these ideas in my book, The Cryptocurrency Revolution, which is available here and from other booksellers, online and offline.

1. What gives Bitcoin its value?

“Bitcoin is magic internet money.”

“Bitcoin is made up out of thin air.”

Many people seem confused about how a value can be attributed to a purely digital currency — especially one such as Bitcoin, which has no central governing authority.

But you could ask exactly the same question about the dollars, euros or pounds that are attributed to our digital bank accounts. All have a notional value that is conferred by a certain set of rules.

The rules that govern the price of Bitcoin (or any other blockchain-based currency with a finite supply)…


I expand on some of these ideas in my book, The Cryptocurrency Revolution, which is available here and from other booksellers, online and offline.

Too many blockchain projects are using new technology to streamline outdated business models. The projects that will power our future will radically rethink the way we transact with each other

Image for post
Image for post

In the previous article, we looked at how blockchain technology, coupled with making information available via APIs, can provide an entirely new business model and leverage the power of the awesome volume of data that we generate every day.

Of course, business models built around data…

Rhian Lewis

Technologist, #Ruby, #blockchain & #cryptocurrency. Co-developer #altcoin portfolio tracker CountMyCrypto. Author of The Cryptocurrency Revolution

Get the Medium app

A button that says 'Download on the App Store', and if clicked it will lead you to the iOS App store
A button that says 'Get it on, Google Play', and if clicked it will lead you to the Google Play store